Designer Spotlight – Jack Lonetto

Where are you from originally?

“Michigan! Just outside of Ann Arbor, a little town called Pinckney. I moved to Florida in 1998 for a change of pace.”

How did you get started in interior design?

“Well, my background is in architecture and when I left Michigan, I came down here to work in an architecture office that didn’t work out the way I was hoping. So, I decided to go back to school for interior design and I graduated from The Art Institute of Fort. Lauderdale in 2000.”

How long have you been a part of the Decorators Unlimited team?

“5 Years!”

What’s your favorite design style?

“International…Bauhaus…Modern…
In the thirties-ish, there was a design movement called Bauhaus at International Design School, so it was the beginning of what we now call Modern Architecture. White walls, flat roofs, ribbon windows, using natural material as decoration like slabs of stone and how they are book-matched to create a pattern. All those things in the thirties was progressive, and it was also the same time period that the Bauhaus movement was starting to do mass production of decorative objects. All this creativity came together under one school called the Bauhaus, and you had all these designers and architects working together. The design I really loved, but it was the idea of having all of these people come together to help one another create the best design is what has always inspired me to go in that direction of design.”

Where do you gain inspiration from?

“Um…good question! it could be anything… Nowadays I could see a pattern and a piece of fabric, or I could be motivated by the way the light hits the street. There are just things that will strike me on every project that is the genesis for the design. I just let my mind be open, and obviously pay attention to what the client’s needs are and what the program statement is for that design, but allow myself to be inspired by something that will help me push it to the next level.”

What is your favorite project you’ve ever worked on?

“I always say that every project I’ve ever worked on is my favorite project until the next project. I think that’s part of being a good designer, is that you’re fully in the moment with the project that you’re on, and you’re loving it and doing everything that you can to make it the best project ever, and then the next project comes along and you’re back in that same different set of parameters, a different set of inspirations, different boundaries that you want to explore, and that’s what makes every project the best!”

What advice do you give your clients when working with them?

“Budget is always a concern with a client, and I never want my client to be embarrassed about what they want to spend on their house, I don’t care what the amount is. I will always try to meet that as a parameter for the project, I just ask the client to be open to spending a little bit more on one piece and a lot less on another to compensate it, but the goal is to always have as rich and appropriate look as possible to what we are doing and not to get fixated on the cost of one item versus another. The overall goal is to meet their budget, and we might have ups and downs in there to do that but it helps us to create a more diverse interior and meet their budget goals. Additional advice would be to come with pictures you like, as well as pictures you don’t like! It’s just as helpful to know what turns you off as to know what turns you on.”

What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received?
“Make sure that anything you can touch is of the highest quality because you can sense cheap with your fingertips.”

If you were designing your dream home, what’s one thing you must have in it?

“Glass walls. Lots of windows! I love having the outside come in.”

When you’re not working, what are you doing?

“Well, there is that little 7-pound bundle of joy. (Laughs) Besides that, if I’m not working and I have free time, I love baking, photography, and traveling!”

Published By: Caitlin Kader

Posted on May 14, 2020 at 3:26 pm

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